NASA and ESA’s Hubble telescope captured images of two interacting galaxies. Both galaxies appear so intertwined that they have a collective name – Arp 91. The intergalactic dance took place over 100 million light-years away from Earth.

Both galaxies have their own names too; the lower one is NGC 5953 and the upper right oval-shaped one is named NGC 5954.

Most astronomers nowadays believe that collisions between spiral galaxies lead to the formation of another type of galaxy, known as elliptical galaxies. These immensely energetic and massive collisions, however, happen on timescales that take place over hundreds of millions of years, says ESA explaining that the galaxies would appear to look the same throughout our lifespans.

Also read: NASA: Hubble discovers 6 massive ‘dead’ galaxies that ran out of gas

In reality, both of them are spiral galaxies, but their shapes appear very different because of their orientation with respect to Earth, reveals NASA. The Arp 91 shows a vivid example of galactic interaction and it is their immense gravitational attraction that causes them to attract.

Most astronomers think that collisions between spiral galaxies lead to the formation of another type of galaxy, known as elliptical galaxies.

Also read: NASA: What did Hubble look at on your birthday? Find out here



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