The board members from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists take the decision on setting the hands of the clock, which was founded in 1945 by Albert Einstein and University of Chicago scientists

The Doomsday Clock illustrating the perils facing the planet and mankind will remain at 100 seconds to midnight this year amid the threats of the COVID-19 pandemic, nuclear war and climate change.

Rachel Bronson, president of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists said in a statement that the hands of the Doomsday Clock remain at 100 seconds to midnight, as close to midnight as ever.

Bronson added that the lethal and fear-inspiring COVID-19 pandemic serves as a historic wake-up call, a vivid illustration that national governments and international organisations are unprepared to manage the truly civilization-ending threats of nuclear weapons and climate change.

Board members from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists take the decision on setting the hands of the clock, which was founded in 1945 by Albert Einstein and University of Chicago scientists who helped develop the world’s first atomic weapons. The board members from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists include 13 Nobel laureates.

Doomsday clock was created in 1947, the clock moved to 100 seconds to midnight in January last year, the closest to midnight it has been in its history. It was originally set at seven minutes to midnight. The furthest it has ever been from midnight is seventeen minutes, following the end of the Cold War in 1991.

Former California governor Jerry Brown, executive chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists said that it’s time to eliminate nuclear weapons, not build more of them.

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