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Researchers found that people who consumed the spicy fruit more than four times a week has a 40% less of dying of a heart attack
Researchers found that people who consumed the spicy fruit more than four times a week has a 40% less of dying of a heart attack|File image 
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Spicy news for New Year: Chilli cuts risk of death by heart attack

A new study has revealed that people who consumed the spicy fruit more than four times a week have 40% less chance of dying from a heart attack

Team EastMojo

Team EastMojo

Guwahati: Known to be some of the hottest in the world, organically-grown chilies of Northeast India are a part of staple diet for people living in the region. Now, they have a good reason to rejoice as as a new study has said that eating chillies cuts the risk of death from heart attacks.

Researchers found that people who consumed the spicy fruit more than four times a week have 40% less chance of dying from a heart attack. Their morality risk for all cause was 23% lower, compared with those who did not eat chilies.

For the study, which was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology recently, researchers utilised the health data from over 22,800 individuals living in Italy as chilli is a common ingredient there. They examined the health status of each person for a period of roughly eight years, using self-reported eating habits to determine how often they consumed chilli peppers.

At the end of the study, the data showed an incredibly clear link between chilli pepper consumption and a lower overall risk of death by heart attack. In fact, those who made a habit of eating chili peppers were 40% less likely to die from a heart attack than those who rarely or never ate the veggie. On top of that, the risk of death from cerebrovascular issues, meaning blockages in the blood flow in the brain, was cut by over half.

Those are some pretty surprising numbers, especially when you consider we’re talking about something as simple as consuming a specific vegetable. The researchers suggest that other plants of the capsicum species, which includes chili peppers, may offer a wealth of health benefits that are still not well understood.

The team now plans to investigate the biochemical mechanisms that make chili good for our health.

External experts praised the study while pointing out some limitations.