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The water policy, designed to ensure economic prosperity and well being of the people, was launched by state irrigation and water resource minister C Lalrinsanga in Aizawl, Mizoram on Wednesday
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Mizoram launches state water policy

New policy to address high incidence of severe droughts and floods, which intermittently affect agriculture and water availability in some areas of the state

Aizawl: Mizoram on Wednesday officially launched ‘State Water Policy’ to address the high incidence of severe droughts and floods, which intermittently affect agriculture and water availability in some areas of the state due to climate change.

The water policy, designed to ensure economic prosperity and well being of the people, was launched by state irrigation and water resource minister C Lalrinsanga in a function held at irrigation and water resources department conference hall in Aizawl.

The formulation of the Mizoram State Water Policy is supported by leading German’s international cooperation services, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH under the Climate Change adaptation North Eastern programme currently effective in the state of Mizoram, Nagaland, Meghalaya and Sikkim.

The technical support was provided by IORA Ecological Solutions, New Delhi.

Speaking on the occasion, Lalrinsanga appreciated the hard work of Irrigation and Water Resources department in taking the lead to formulate the state’s water policy, which will enable a wide section of the community to understand the meaning and need of a water policy.

He strongly believed that the policy will be for the betterment of the future generations especially in the advent of climate change and unsustainable utilisation of water resources. He emphasised on the urgent need to create awareness across the state and within communities.

The minister pointed out that many rivers in the states are now flowing way below what they use to be few years back even during peak season.

Water use for irrigation is now getting scarce and effort to utilise rain water is now practised.

GIZ senior adviser Kenenth M Pala, who spoke at the launch event, said the State Water Policy should be viewed as a dynamic document that is envisaged to be updated every five years ensuring that it meets the evolving paradigms of management of water resources at international, national and state level.

The official launch was also addressed Dr S Bhattacharya from IORA, who spoke about the salient features of the new policy.

The formulation of water policy was necessitated by high dependency for water on springs, rivers and seasonal water sources. The effect of climate change reflected by rainfall being perceptibally erratic, high incidence of severe events like droughts and floods intermittently affecting agriculture and water availability in some areas further calls for an integrated water policy, an official said.