Karizia Phimu and Athedziia Kape, both six-year-old girls from Maopungdong village in Manipur’s Senapati district, trying their hands at traditional loin loom weaving
Karizia Phimu and Athedziia Kape, both six-year-old girls from Maopungdong village in Manipur’s Senapati district, trying their hands at traditional loin loom weaving|EastMojo image
MANIPUR

How these Manipur kids are weaving magic amid COVID-19 lockdown

While people across India are staying at home amid coronavirus lockdown, 2 six-year-old girls in Senapati are utilising time to learn traditional Naga loin loom weaving

Vangamla Salle K S

Vangamla Salle K S

Senapati: At a time when people across the country are staying at home during the national lockdown amid novel coronavirus pandemic, two young girls from Manipur’s Senapati district are wisely investing their time to learn something which most of us have forgotten or don't get to do too often.

Karizia Phimu and Athedziia Kape, both six-year-old girls from Maopungdong village, are experimenting their interest in loin loom weaving, an indigenous weaving tradition of the Mao Naga tribal community. Did anybody say lockdown was boring?

Over the years, most traditional weaving techniques are slowly losing its sheen to power looms and most people, especially youngsters, are seldom seen to indulge in such traditional practices, a threat to the existence of indigenous activities.

In a video, which has now gone viral, the girls, both studying at Class I at St Peter’s School in Maopungdong, are seen in a relaxed atmosphere while sitting outside their home courtyard and diligently focusing on the loom. The bright colours that were laid out before them as they continued to weave add to the beauty.

Despite their tender age, the girls seem to be quite intrigued by various designs and motifs used in the Mao traditional attire
Despite their tender age, the girls seem to be quite intrigued by various designs and motifs used in the Mao traditional attire EastMojo image

Despite their tender age, the girls seem to be quite intrigued by various designs and motifs used in the Mao traditional attire.

In the village, where most of their peers often spend their time playing with toys, these two young girls remained at home and spent their time on a more productive activity by learning what their ancestors had been practising for ages.

Backstrap loom weaving is widely practised in Northeast India and mostly engaged by women to practise their indigenous craft. The looms have no permanent fixtures and it can be easily shifted to places as per the weaver’s convenience.

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